Honeymoon Fund Jar

My sister is getting married this weekend. The bartenders’ gratuity is already figured into the cost of the reception, so she thought it would be fun to collect donations to her honeymoon trip (in Australia!) at the bar. So I made her this jar … I was, of course, finishing it at the last minute, so I just took quick pics with my phone, but it was a fun project filled with tecniques and I wanted to share them with you …

I started with a Gordon Food Services’ pickle jar … I threw out the lid, cleaned the jar and got ready to etch the glass.

I wanted the jar to last beyond the reception. Since my sister is always traveling, I thought it would be nice for her to be able to remove the wedding stuff and keep it as a change jar for whatever trip she is planning in the future. So, I decided to etch a monogrammed heart on the front.

I cut out both a heart and a monogrammed S from etchall® etchmask using my Cricut. etchmask is a sticky vinyl … personally, I find it works much better for etching than a traditional vinyl since it is thicker, sticks better and doesn’t stretch as easily as vinyl does.

My sister likes things simple, so after I applied both the heart and the monogram, I trimmed off the fancy swirlies on the letter with a craft knife.

After making sure all of the edges were tight, I added my leftover pieces of etchmask to the edges of the design to make sure I didn’t etch anything I didn’t mean to.

Then, I applied a thick, even layer of etchall® etching crème to the design and let it sit for 15 minutes. I scraped the crème off and put it back in the bottle (it’s reusable) and then washed the jar with soap and water, removed the stencil and washed it again.

The metal tags are from Art C. My husband used sandpaper to remove the sharp edges and then stamped the words Honeymoon Fund into one of them (they are a pretty thick steel and I wasn’t hammering hard enough). I then used a fine-pointed Sharpie to make the letters dark and prominent.

Since the wedding colors are University of Michigan blue and gold, I used the chipped sapphire Distress Crayon to color the heart and the word love. I used my finger to smooth out the color on the heart … I love the streaking effect it gave.

I used a sticker and label set from Tim Holtz to add their wedding date. I tied gold ribbon to the top of the jar and used jump rings to adhere each of the tags.

Since the banquet hall is pretty dark, I figured the tags can sort of layer over each other and the etching on the jar during the reception and then she can remove the tags and ribbon and just have the jar with her new last initial monogrammed for later.

The entire project, because I already had most of the supplies on hand, was® inexpensive. The only thing I purchased were the tags, which were on sale at JoAnn Fabric and Crafts for $2.39 each — and they come three to a pack, so I have quite a few left for additional projects. Oh, and I figured it was bad luck to give a tip jar without any money in it, so I threw in a few $1 bills to get them started.

Dance Like No One Is Watching


So, I found this little mirror in the clearance section at Michael’s one day and knew it would be perfect for an etchall® etching creme project.

And it is!

My problem is photographing it … I tried inside, outside, in light, little light … nothing would work. I wasn’t going to share this project, because I couldn’t photograph it, but it was so fun to make — and, I think, perfect for a little girl’s room, bathroom or foyer — that I decided to share my horrible photos, but fun techniques with you.

I started by designing the quote on my tablet using Cricut’s Design Space app. Then I used the Cricut to cut out the words using etchall® etchmask.

Next, I adhered the  etchall® etchmask transfer sheet to the surface so I could pick up the little dots in the “e” and other letters.

etchall_mirror_candy_spiegel2I then pulled the etchmask off of the Cricut mat and placed it on the mirror.

Then, I coated the surface with etchall® and let it sit for 15 minutes. Then, I scraped up the etchall® and placed it back into the bottle for another time. I rinsed off the mirror, removed the etchmask and gave it a final cleaning and it was done!


It really is crisp and clear, but I couldn’t get the letters to not reflect in the photo — unless I focused on something in the mirror and then you couldn’t see the letters. So, trust me when I say it is perfect and crystal clear in person!


Be Amazing with Etchall


This project has been working in my mind for some time … it started life as a medicine cabinet someone removed from a house and sold at an antique show. I wanted to put a positive saying on it so that whenever you look in the mirror, you will get a bit of a pat on the back.


I cleaned it up and started its transformation.


I used my Cricut to cut out the words “Be Amazing” on etchall etchmask stencil combo pack. Once I cut out the yellow vinyl, I placed the white transfer paper on top and then pulled it off the mat.


I then positioned it on the mirror and carefully removed the transfer paper. Then I used a craft pick to remove the letters, followed by a brayer to make sure everything was stuck down tightly.


etchall etching creme is extremely simple to use … about the only way you can mess it up is if you drip onto a surface you did not want etched. I always think I’ll be careful and then I drop a tool or something and mess it up, so I was careful to tape off and mask any glass areas I did not want etched.


Then, I placed the etchall in a thick, even coat across my vinyl and set the timer for 15 minutes. NOTE: Those air bubbles would not be a good thing if they were by my design. Normally, I would have taken the spatula and worked them out. But since they were on a part of the mirror I was not etching, I didn’t worry about them.

When the timer went off, I used the spatula to scrape all of the etchall into my plastic container and then poured it back into the bottle. It is reusable, so you don’t need to worry about ever getting too much!

Then, I took a wet paper towel to remove any residue and ripped off all of the vinyl and tape.


One more pass with a wet paper towel and it is amazing!


I then taped off the mirror again and painted the frame with three colors of Distress Paint. When dry, I covered it with a coat of white chalk paint and then sprayed it with rubbing alcohol while still wet. I let it sit for a few minutes and then used a baby wipe to remove the color. In some places, it went down to the original white finish. In other places, the Distress Paint shows through. And some places are just pretty white.


I had planned to do more, but it looked so perfect the way it was, I decided to leave it. I had intended this project to go in a craft show, but I love it so much, it might stay in my house. After all, we all could use a bit of encouragement now and then!

Are you ready to try your hand at making a custom mirror with etchall? Visit etchall.com to purchase yours, today … use the code CANDYS and you will get 10% off your entire order! Click here and get creating today!

This post is sponsored by etchall.

Faux Sea Glass Charm


When I was little, my grandmother and mom would take me along the shores of Lake Erie, where my mom grew up, to pick seashells and sea glass. Technically, it isn’t sea glass, since it is from one of the Great Lakes and not the sea, but I was never sure what else to call it. It is actually pieces of glass from windows, bottles and other things that have fallen into the water. The current then tumbles the glass making it milky colored with rounded edges. Both my mom and my grandmother had Mason jars filled with the treasures we collected from the beach.

These days, between recycling and so many treasure hunters, the beaches around Lake Erie are pretty much clear of sea glass. But, I have figured out an extremely easy way to make some!

I started with clear glass beads. Be sure they are not crystals — the amount of lead used to make crystals may not work with the etchall.


I placed them in the bottom of a container (use plastic so it doesn’t etch the container) and then covered them with etchall dip ‘n etch liquid.

After 15 minutes, I used a plastic spoon to pick them out of the solution, draining off as much of the etchall as possible, and placed them on a thick paper plate covered with paper towels to catch any liquid I missed. Then, I poured the etchall back into the container. (It is completely reusable and you will be amazed at how little you use each time!)

I put my beads into a colander and rinsed with dish soap and water to remove any remaining etchall and then put them on another paper towel to dry.


The etchall dip ‘n etch liquid gave the beads a milky white or frosted appearance, as you can see in the beads above.


Next, I put the beads into a small plastic bag and added a couple of drops of alcohol ink. I’m not sure if pink is a “natural” color of sea glass, but I was feeling pink, so that’s what I used.


After swishing them around in the alcohol ink for a few seconds, I dumped the bag onto another paper towel covered paper plate to take off an excess ink and allow them to dry. Note: I found the plates and paper towels worked great for this project. There is not a lot of liquid to absorb, but the etchall and/or alcohol could damage surfaces, so this kept everything safe, neat and clean.


I love the variety of hues I got with the alcohol ink.

If you decided not to use the etchall, you would not get the creamy, milky hue of sea glass. It would look more like pale stained glass. The etchall is what makes it look as if it came from the sea.


The photo above shows my test beads. Notice how much of a difference the etchall makes … it takes away some of the transparency, but it also holds onto a lot more color. The results are stunning and the beads have the exact weight and feel of sea glass!


Once my beads were created, it was time to make the jewelry. This is a new type of art for me and I struggled a bit with the technique. Fortunately, I have two friends who came to my rescue with additional tools and supplies and the know-how to help me turn my vision into reality.

Basically, I placed the beads on a pin (I used a couple of different ones in my design), bent and cut the pin, and then turned it into a loop and attached it with a jump ring to either the bezel or chain.


The bezel and glass are from Craft Fantastic and the paper (of the Hawaiian lady) is from Authentique.


Then, for a final touch, I added a seahorse charm and a clip so it can go on a key ring, purse or bag.


Are you ready to try your hand at making faux sea glass beads with etchall? Visit etchall.com to purchase yours, today … use the code CANDYS and you will get 10% off your entire order! Click here and get creating today!


This post is sponsored by etchall.

For the Birds


Spring is just around the corner and the songbirds are starting to return. Welcome them to your yard with these unique feeders made from thrift-store finds.

I started by collecting some glass pieces at my local Salvation Army and Goodwill stores. I even found the little mice figurine there (I sprayed it with a UV protector so it will not fade in the sun.)

Next, I got to work etching with etchall.


I used a Cricut to cut out the etchall etchmask and used the etchmask transfer sheets to transfer the images to the plates.


Then, I used a pick to pull out the pieces where the etchall will go.


I used painter’s tape to mark off the rest of the plate and then applied etchall. (It gets brown with use.) Apply a thick, even coat for the best etching. Let it sit for 15 minutes, scrape the excess back into the jar (it is reusable!) and then rinse it off and remove the tape and etchmask.


I used silicone to adhere my pieces of glass together. I let each piece sit for an hour before adhering the next piece.


I tucked the little mice in one of the pieces.


Here are the two finished pieces … perfect for the garden.

etchall_birds_candy_spiegel-2 And here is each piece with birdseed … they hold about a cup of seed each. But you could also use it as a bird bath.etchall_birds_candy_spiegel-1

My chickens tried them out and loved them. However, chickens weigh too much to leave these where they can try to roost on them. These are meant for the little songbirds in my yard. I cannot wait for spring to officially arrive so I can put them outside!etchall_birds_candy_spiegel-3Are you ready to make one for the birds in your yard? Visit etchall.com to purchase yours, today … use the code CANDYS and you will get 10% off your entire order! Click here and get etching today!

NOTE: I received compensation for this post.

Let the Light Shine!

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel MAIN

Today is a beautiful fall day, but my heart is ready for Christmas. I am not ready for the cold outside, but I am all set for a little faux snow, like I put on this lantern.

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel

The lantern began as a plain, black lantern I found at a big box store for less than $20. I love that it has a battery-operated candle that screws to the base and can be turned on and off from the base. It was the perfect blank slate to transform!

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel2

I started by removing the glass panels so they could be etched. Then I added a bit of Distress Paint to the filigree on the top of the lantern and to the latch that holds the front door closed.

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel3

Then, I coated the ledges with Art Glitter Vintage Glass Glitter.

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel4

I cleaned each of the glass pieces with water and a paper towel (do not use Windex) and then added stickers from Elizabeth Craft Designs. (I should have taped the backside of the glass pieces as well — since the etchall got a bit messy and some of the pieces were etched on the wrong side. You cannot easily see the mistakes in the finished lantern, but I thought I should pass along my lesson learned!)

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel5

Next, I coated each piece with etchall. (it gets brown as you use it, but it still works well) and let it sit for 15 minutes. Then, I scraped off the excess and put it back in the jar and rinsed off each panel.

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel6

I love the soft, frosty feeling the etched glass provides.

etchall Lantern by Candy Spiegel MAIN

And it still allows the light to shine through!

Are you ready to make one of your own?

etchall is ready to help … use the code CANDYS and you will get 10% off your entire order! Click here and get etching today!

NOTE: I received compensation for this post.

You Look Marvelous!

My future daughter-in-law loves mirrors — the bigger the better. We have been to dozens of stores looking, but have been unable to find the perfect mirror at the right price. In the meantime, I thought I could alter one a bit so she has something pretty to check her outfit each morning.


Mirrors, you should know, are rather challenging to photograph, so my chickens helped me out with this one …

I started with an inexpensive (about $15) full-length mirror. It had a bit of a Greek detail to the frame, so I opted for a Greek-inspired flourish from a Cricut cartridge to decorate the top and bottom of the mirror. The process is so simple …


First, cut the image out on etchmask. This is an adhesive vinyl made by etchall. It is thicker than Cricut’s vinyl, which means it is less likely to tear and the Cricut doesn’t cut all the way through the backing paper, so everything stays together until you take it apart.

I did two images … one for the top and one for the bottom. I reversed and flipped the bottom image before cutting it out.

Next, remove the entire piece of etchmask from the cutting mat and cover with a transfer sheet cut to the same size. (etchmask comes with the transfer sheets, so there is nothing extra to buy!) Carefully remove the backing from the etchmask and adhere it to your surface. The transfer sheet holds it all together for you. Once adhered to the mirror, carefully remove the transfer sheet, as seen in the photo above.

Now, use the etchall Squeegee to work out all of the air bubbles and make sure the vinyl is adhered well.


Now use a pick or piercing tool to pull out the design. Tip: Start in the center of the image and pull it out from there.


If your image is too close to the edge, add washi tape, masking tape or painter’s tape. You do not want to get the etchall anywhere else on the glass. Then, use the squeegee to apply a thick, even coat of etchall.

Wait 15 minutes, then scoop up all of the etchall with the squeegee and put it back in the bottle — it is reusable.


Since this project was so large, I used wet paper towels to clean off the rest of the etchall and then carefully removed the tape and stencils.

Here’s how it turned out …


Are you ready to decorate a mirror of your own? etchall is ready to help you … use the code CANDYS and you will get 10% off your entire order — including premade stencils if you do not have a Cricut or other electronic cutter. Click here and get etching today!

NOTE: I received compensation for this post.